Creature Feature launches

Starting September 5, 2013, and running through Halloween, The Monitor will be printing a nine-part series entitled “Creature Feature.” Published each Thursday, this column will feature my retellings of creepy tales of ghosts, ghouls and cucuys from deep South Texas, with illustrations by a variety of local artists. The first…

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Creature Feature

Beginning September 5 and continuing through Halloween, The Monitor will be running my nine-part series Creature Feature. Published each Thursday, this series will feature creepy tales of ghosts, ghouls and cucuys from deep south Texas, each accompanied by  the illustrations of artists like Xavier Garza. I will be posting links…

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Advance Praise for Flower, Song, Dance

At last! A translation of Aztec poetry done not by an historian, a linguist or an anthropologist, but by a poet. In this volume, David Bowles captures the heart and the soul of the Nahua poets, and carries them safely across the narrow bridge swinging far above the perilous waters…

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A Poetic and Musical Celebration of Aztec Culture

On September 21, 2013 I will be the featured artist for Flower, Song, Dance: A Poetic and Musical Celebration of Aztec Culture. I will read from my newly published translations of Aztec verse against the backdrop of Dr. Carl Seale’s Toxcatl, a ballet inspired by the celebration of the fifth…

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“Octopus Traps” by Matsuo Bashō

Japanese poet Bashō composed the following haiku in the summer of 1688 and later published it in Backpack Notes. The “octopus traps” are jars that would be lowered into the water by fishermen in the afternoon and then raised the next morning. The creatures that had slipped inside what appeared…

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“Lightning” by Matsuo Bashō

Japanese poet Bashō composed the following haiku in the fall of 1694, just months before his death. A jag of lightning— Then, flitting toward the darkness, A night heron’s scream. —Translated by David Bowles, July 2013 Original Japanese inazuma ya yami no kata yuku goi no koe  

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“This Road” by Matsuo Bashō

Japanese poet Bashō composed the following haiku during the fall of 1694, not long before his death. Alone on this road, Not a single passerby— Autumn night descends. —Translated by David Bowles, July 2013 Original Japanese kono michi ya yuku hito nashi ni aki no kure  

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“Summer Grass” by Matsuo Bashō

The following haiku is from Bashō’s famous haibun (blended prose-verse travelogue) Narrow Road to the Deep North, which describes his 1689 journey into the less populated wilderness of northern Japan in search of famous utamakaru or sites that inspired great poetry. At one point he visits the ruins of the…

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“Stillness” by Matsuo Bashō

The following haiku is from Bashō’s famous haibun (blended prose-verse travelogue) Narrow Road to the Deep North, which describes his 1689 journey into the less populated wilderness of northern Japan in search of famous utamakaru or sites that inspired great poetry. At one point he visits a mountain temple high…

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2012 Appearances

2012 Appearances October 18—Presentation at IDEA Quest in Edinburg. 3:15 pm to 3:45 pm. CLICK HERE TO VIEW VIDEO. October 24—Presentation at Lenoir Elementary in Donna, Texas. 2:30 pm October 24—Featured author at Pasta, Poetry & Vino. Schneider’s Gasthaus and Beergarden. McAllen, Texas. 7 pm. October 26—Reading at We Need Words.…

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