“River Willow” by Karai Senryū

Karai Senryū was born in 1718 in Edo. A town official and frequent judge of poetry contests, he was responsible for popularizing a lighter, more whimsical variation of haiku that now bears his name (senryū). Before his passing at the age of 73, he composed the following jisei or death…

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Poems forthcoming in Cybersoleil

My poems “Santander” and “Escape” have been accepted for publication in the upcoming winter edition of Cybersoleil Journal.  

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Poetry forthcoming in Red River Review

The delightful folks at the Red River Review have accepted my poems “Tlacuache, Cornered” and “Losing My Accent” for publication in their August 2015 issue.  

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Translations forthcoming in Axolotl

The literary magazine Axolotl will be publishing my translations of four Nahuatl poems in their upcoming issue.  

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The Ghost of the Moon

Originally published in the 2015 Texas Poetry Calendar. The ghost of the moon Trembles upon the river, Its pallor cracked and veined By the oblique shadows of branches— Ebony and mesquite, grasping at darkness. Like a lunar fragment A white form floats in those mangling waters— A face obscured by…

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“Moon” by Saiba

Saiba was a Zen Buddhist monk who wrote this jisei or death haiku as he sensed his end approach in the fall of 1858. He finally died on the night of the harvest moon. So I’ll just scoot my pillow closer to the full autumn moon. —Translated by David Bowles,…

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“The Scarecrow” by Bonchō

Nozawa Bonchō was born in the city of Kanazawa in Japan’s Ishikawa Prefecture. Though he worked most of his life as a doctor in Kyoto, Bonchō never made much money. He became one of Matsuo Bashō’s foremost disciples, which saved him when he was convicted of smuggling: due to his…

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Keeping It Real

This poem was previously published in the 2014 edition of Huizache and in the collection Shattering and Bricolage. During the 80s I lived in the projects, Section 8 housing, a block of apartments Facing the Pharr Community Center. Dad had abandoned us. I was sixteen, Sleeping on pallets with Matthew…

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Poem in The Thing Itself

My poem “The Wall” will be appearing in The Thing Itself, the literary journal of Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio.  

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“Behind the Falls” by Matsuo Bashō

On May 20, 1689, a few weeks before the beginning of the three-month time of seclusion Buddhist monks were required to observe each summer, the Japanese poet Bashō climbed into the mountains to visit Urami Falls. Passing behind the cascade, he tarried a while in a cave, looking out at the world…

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