Translations in Somos en escrito

The on-line magazine Somos en escrito has published three translations of mine from Classical Nahuatl into English and Spanish. You can read them now by heading over to that website.  

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“Cradlesong” to be published in Metamorphoses

I’m delighted that the journal Metamorphoses has accepted “A Cradlesong,” my translation from the Nahuatl of “Cōzolcuīcatl,” poem LVII of the Songs of Mexico codex composed in 1585. In the 800-word sequence, a young Mexica girl envisions the fallen young king of Tenochtitlan, Ahuizotl, as a baby, youth and man,…

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Poems in Rattle #47

Just received word that my translations of three Japanese poems by Karai Senryū have been accepted for publication in issue 47 of Rattle (forthcoming March 2015). Ii darou! (“Cool, ain’t it?”)  

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“Any hope of ever seeing you again” by Eugenio Montale

Eugenio Montale was an Italian poet awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1975. His work occasionally seems difficult, but the apparent obscurity often arises from references to events in his life of which the reader has no knowledge. The following poem, for example, alludes to an event both poet…

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Featured Poet for Upcoming Red River Review

I am delighted and honored to have been selected feature poet for the August edition of the Red River Review (edited by the very cool Alan Gann), in which several of my poems will appear: “taming,” “kill the muse,” “Palimpsest Soul,” “Lovely Little Thing,” “Tzompantli,” “The Paradoxical Axiom,” “Weathered and…

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“I often encountered the evil of living” by Eugenio Montale

Eugenio Montale was an Italian poet awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1975. I often encountered the evil of living I often encountered the evil of living: it was the choked brook that gurgles, it was the curling of the sun-parched leaf, it was the horse that collapses. The…

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Oaxacan Flânerie to Be Published

I am pleased to announce that my poetry cycle Oaxacan Flânerie has been accepted for publication in the upcoming edition of the Langdon Review of the Arts in Texas.  

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“Butterfly” by Saijō Yaso

Saijō Yaso was a Japanese poet and scholar from the early 20th century who specialized in French symbolist verse. His own work ranged from darker symbolism to lighter children’s lyrics. Butterfly When in time I slip down to hell where my parents and friends await, what will I take to…

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“When with Fatal Law the Shadow Threatened Me” by Stéphane Mallarmé

Stéphane Mallarmé was a French poet from the second half of the 19th century. The literary child of Baudelaire, Mallarmé crafted difficult poetry rich with disturbing symbols and musical language. Here is a translation of one of my favorite poems of his. When with Fatal Law the Shadow Threatened Me…

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“Tomino’s Hell” by Saijō Yaso

I’m always looking for ways to combine my love of poetry, translation and the macabre, so I was delighted to stumble across a sort of “creepy pasta” Internet legend about a cursed Japanese poem that causes tragedy and death should you read it aloud. I quickly looked for the piece,…

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