A Poetic and Musical Celebration of Aztec Culture

On September 21, 2013 I will be the featured artist for Flower, Song, Dance: A Poetic and Musical Celebration of Aztec Culture. I will read from my newly published translations of Aztec verse against the backdrop of Dr. Carl Seale’s Toxcatl, a ballet inspired by the celebration of the fifth…

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Upcoming Article in Translation Review

My article entitled “Translating ‘An Otomi Song of Spring’” has been accepted for publication by Translation Review, the journal of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA), housed at The University of Texas at Dallas. ALTA is the only organization in the United States dedicated wholly to literary translation, and it…

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“Final Journey” by Matsuo Bashō

Japanese poet Bashō composed the following haiku in the winter of 1694, just four days before his death. At the time, despite his illness, he had embarked on another trek across the Japanese countryside. Ill on a journey— Through desolate fields my dreams Aimlessly wander. —Translated by David Bowles, July…

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“Octopus Traps” by Matsuo Bashō

Japanese poet Bashō composed the following haiku in the summer of 1688 and later published it in Backpack Notes. The “octopus traps” are jars that would be lowered into the water by fishermen in the afternoon and then raised the next morning. The creatures that had slipped inside what appeared…

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“Lightning” by Matsuo Bashō

Japanese poet Bashō composed the following haiku in the fall of 1694, just months before his death. A jag of lightning— Then, flitting toward the darkness, A night heron’s scream. —Translated by David Bowles, July 2013 Original Japanese inazuma ya yami no kata yuku goi no koe  

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“This Road” by Matsuo Bashō

Japanese poet Bashō composed the following haiku during the fall of 1694, not long before his death. Alone on this road, Not a single passerby— Autumn night descends. —Translated by David Bowles, July 2013 Original Japanese kono michi ya yuku hito nashi ni aki no kure  

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“Summer Grass” by Matsuo Bashō

The following haiku is from Bashō’s famous haibun (blended prose-verse travelogue) Narrow Road to the Deep North, which describes his 1689 journey into the less populated wilderness of northern Japan in search of famous utamakaru or sites that inspired great poetry. At one point he visits the ruins of the…

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“Stillness” by Matsuo Bashō

The following haiku is from Bashō’s famous haibun (blended prose-verse travelogue) Narrow Road to the Deep North, which describes his 1689 journey into the less populated wilderness of northern Japan in search of famous utamakaru or sites that inspired great poetry. At one point he visits a mountain temple high…

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Langdon Review Weekend

I’ll be presenting and reading from Flower, Song, Dance: Aztec and Mayan Poetry this September 5, 2013, at the Langdon Review Weekend. Langdon Review of the Arts in Texas is an annual publication of Tarleton State University providing an overview of the year’s most exciting cultural accomplishments in Texas.  The…

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“The Song of Moquihuitzin” to Be Published

My translation of “The Song of Moquihuitzin” from the Aztec codex Songs of Mexico (Cantares Mexicanos) will be published in issue 19 of BorderSenses, a great literary journal.  

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