“Tomino’s Hell” by Saijō Yaso

I’m always looking for ways to combine my love of poetry, translation and the macabre, so I was delighted to stumble across a sort of “creepy pasta” Internet legend about a cursed Japanese poem that causes tragedy and death should you read it aloud. I quickly looked for the piece, titled “Tomino’s Hell,” and I knew right away it needed my loving touch. The English translations were bad, nearly incomprehensible (if still eerie). A quick read-through of the Japanese convinced me that it was time for a fresh and more accurate version in English verse.

Apparently the story of a young boy’s damnation for unnamed acts, “Tomino’s Hell” was published, I discovered, in a 1919 collection of poetry by Saijō Yaso titled Sakin or Gold Dust. The poet was a university professor and lived in France for a time, studying at the Sorbonne; his work is heavily influenced by French poets, especially symbolists like Arthur Rimbaud, Stéphane Mallarmé and Paul Valéry (with whom he became friends). Though Saijō’s later work was ostensibly for children, it was filled with strange symbols and wordplay that could be quite unsettling.

Here’s my rendering of this very dark and disturbing poem (with footnotes on important matters). I’ve not actually read the thing aloud, so I can’t speak to whether the curse is real. I’ll leave that to your own discretion.

Tomino’s Hell1

Elder sister vomits blood,
younger sister’s breathing fire
while sweet little Tomino
just spits up the jewels.2

All alone does Tomino
go falling into that hell,
a hell of utter darkness,
without even flowers.

Is Tomino’s big sister
the one who whips him?
The purpose of the scourging
hangs dark in his mind.3

Lashing and thrashing him, ah!
But never quite shattering.
One sure path to Avici,4
the eternal hell.

Into that blackest of hells
guide him now, I pray—
to the golden sheep,
to the nightingale.

How much did he put
in that leather pouch
to prepare for his trek to
the eternal hell?

Spring is coming
to the valley, to the wood,
to the spiraling chasms
of the blackest hell.

The nightingale in her cage,
the sheep aboard the wagon,
and tears well up in the eyes
of sweet little Tomino.5

Sing, o nightingale,
in the vast, misty forest—
he screams he only misses
his little sister.

His wailing desperation
echoes throughout hell—
a fox peony
opens its golden petals.

Down past the seven mountains
and seven rivers of hell—
the solitary journey
of sweet little Tomino.

If in this hell they be found,
may they then come to me, please,
those sharp spikes of punishment
from Needle Mountain.6

Not just on some empty whim
Is flesh pierced with blood-red pins:
they serve as hellish signposts
for sweet little Tomino.7

—translated by David Bowles
June 29, 2014

1. The term here translated “hell” is “jigoku,” the Buddhist hell complex into which very sinful people can be reincarnated. Note also that the poem follows a 7-7-7-5 syllabic pattern, evocative of most traditional Japanese verse.

2. What is happening here isn’t immediately obviously, but clearly Tomino’s sisters are suffering while he is not.

3. Apparently the lashes Tomino is receiving on his way into hell are deserved (although another possible reading of the Japanese might be “the purpose of the scourging worries him,” suggesting possibly that he doesn’t know why he’s being punished. To me it seems he knows.

4. The poem reveals that Tomino is headed to “mugen jigoku,” the Japanese translation of the Sanskrit “Avīci,” or “waveless.” Avīci is the lowest of hells in Buddhism, one whose torments last so long (aeons and eons) that souls seem to be trapped there for eternity. There are five horrible sins you can commit to end up in this place: creating a schism within the community of Buddhist monks and nuns, shedding the blood of a Buddha, killing an enlightened person, or (AHEM) intentionally murdering one’s father or one’s mother (!). Holy crap, I think we might have just figured out what Tomino did!!!! Of course, that’s reading the poem literally, about which see note #7.

5. It strikes me that the sheep and nightingale are symbolic of Tomino’s sisters.

6. Needle Mountain (Hari no Yama) is another lovely feature of Buddhist hell. This is where the tormentors of the damned get their spikes.

7. Another possible translation would be “Not just on some empty whim / will I pierce with blood-red pins / the marks upon the body / of sweet little Tomino..” Either way, the conclusion is chilling! Now, given that the poet had a predilection for symbolist poetry, it’s very likely that all this talk of Tomino’s descending into hell is mere metonymy, and that some other sort of earthly hell of interpersonal relationships is being described. The Japanese Wikipedia article on Saijō suggests that he wrote this poem upon the death of either his sister or father; given the aims of symbolist poetry (to avoid to describing things themselves and instead describe their effects), it strikes me that the poem is meant to show Saijō’s emotional distress upon someone’s death, comparing his survivor’s guilt to a journey into hell.

Original Japanese

トミノの地獄
Tomino no Jigoku

姉は血を吐く、妹(いもと)は火吐く、
ane wa chi wo haku, imoto wa hihaku,

可愛いトミノは 宝玉(たま)を吐く。
kawaii tomino wa tama wo haku

ひとり地獄に落ちゆくトミノ、
hitori jigoku ni ochiyuku tomino,

地獄くらやみ花も無き。
jigoku kurayami hana mo naki.

鞭で叩くはトミノの姉か、
muchi de tataku wa tomino no ane ka,

鞭の朱総(しゅぶさ)が 気にかかる。
muchi no shuso ga ki ni kakaru.

叩けや叩きやれ叩かずとても、
tatake yatataki yare tatakazu totemo,

無間地獄はひとつみち。
mugen jigoku wa hitotsu michi.

暗い地獄へ案内(あない)をたのむ、
kurai jigoku e anai wo tanomu,

金の羊に、鶯に。
kane no hitsu ni, uguisu ni.

皮の嚢(ふくろ)にやいくらほど入れよ、
kawa no fukuro ni yaikura hodoireyo,

無間地獄の旅支度。
mugen jigoku no tabishitaku.

春が 来て候(そろ)林に谿(たに)に、
haru ga kitesoru hayashi ni tani ni,

暗い地獄谷七曲り。
kurai jigoku tanina namagari.

籠にや鶯、車にや羊、
kagoni yauguisu, kuruma ni yahitsuji,

可愛いトミノの眼にや涙。
kawaii tomino no me niya namida.

啼けよ、鶯、林の雨に
nakeyo, uguisu, hayashi no ame ni

妹恋しと 声かぎり。
imouto koishi to koe ga giri.

啼けば反響(こだま)が地獄にひびき、
nakeba kodama ga jigoku ni hibiki,

狐牡丹の花がさく。
kitsunebotan no hana ga saku.

地獄七山七谿めぐる、
jigoku nanayama nanatani meguru,

可愛いトミノのひとり旅。
kawaii tomino no hitoritabi.

地獄ござらばもて 来てたもれ、
jigoku gozaraba mote kite tamore,

針の御山(おやま)の留針(とめはり)を。
hari no oyama no tomebari wo.

赤い留針だてにはささぬ、
akai tomehari date niwa sasanu,

可愛いトミノのめじるしに。
kawaii tomino no mejirushi ni.

77 Comments

  1. This is such a seriously beautiful english translation, thank you so much!! It has such a wonderful feel to it, I don’t know quite how to describe it but it fits the creepy, old-fashion nature of the poem itself ♥

    • Thanks, ma’am! I’m glad you liked my version. The original is so creepy and magical that I wanted people who only know English to have access to that.

      • Thank you so much for making this translation 🙂
        I find this poem extremly beautiful and a bit creepy also
        Love your notes, really helped me understand more of this wonderfull poem as I sadly can’t understand Japanese that well :/. Great job

  2. This is a lovely translation and interpretation! I appreciate the clear amount of intention you put into the translation, in such a way I don’t think many translators do.

    • Thanks! Yeah, I generally take translation pretty seriously, so when I saw the very rough versions of this poem floating around out there, I knew I had to try my hand at it.

  3. I have read both versions aloud and nothing happened

    • Eventually, something will. Eventually, something always happens.

      Whether the poem will be the causal factor… I’m going to say no.

  4. Has anyone experienced anything weird? If so, would you share?

    • I’m pretty certain at this point that it’s a hoax, but it’s an awesome one! Anything that encourages people to read poetry in translation is okay in my book, heh.

    • Well, I don’t know if this counts since it didn’t involve reading the poem aloud myself, but last night I came across with this text once again. I had read Tomino’s Hell earlier, but I didn’t really understand anything what was going on in it, so this time I really tried. I read it multiple times silently – I have to say I missed this awesome translation then, but after reading it I now understand the story, many thanks for that! -, I even shortly listened it being read in Japanese until the terrible voice got too much on my nerves. It was already past midnight when I quit my adventures in the world of creepy Asian urban legends and went brushing my teeth and preparing for bed. When I rose from my seat, I was overcame by this sudden, massive wave of nauseousness and dizziness. It lasted several minutes and I even had to sit down while brushing my teeth beacuse I simply couldn’t stay on my feet. Of course there’s millions of other explanations than a cursed poem (which, mind you, I didn’t read aloud), I was fluish, I had had few drinks – stupid combination, I know – and of course scared myself silly in the first place. But nothing like that quick sickness has ever occured in similar conditions before… I would say it was weird. I wouldn’t even rule out the possible connection with the poem, although I believe it must have been the psychological effect (plus the physical conditions) of the sinister text I couldn’t understand completely and the legend related to it, rather than real otherworldly powers in action 😀

      • I think that your experiment sounds crazy fun and creepy as all get out. I agree it was probably psychological, but isn’t that part of the fun of these sorts of legends? They’re like an interactive horror flick. You don’t have to actually believe in a curse to get a jolt out of playing with the parameters for it.

    • Legend says that if you read it outloud you’ll die but I don’t believe that’s true.

  5. Hi David,
    I too would like to add my thanks for the beautiful translation of this poem. Oddly enough, I get a totally different view from the poem. To me, it is a story based on the ‘favored’ son, who quietly sits by, as his sisters are tormented by a parent. His position as the ‘favored son’ prevents him from aiding his siblings (girls), and this torments his soul. Guilt, to be specific. He basically commits himself to hell due to his lack of championing his sisters, whom he apparently loves, and allows one of them to be beaten to death, while the other remains a ‘prisoner’ to her parents’ torments.
    Again, thank you for such care in the translation of this poem. I wish heartily, there were more such as yourself, that cared as passionately concerning these rare works of art.

  6. I’ve read the original story and it involved one Yomota Inuhiko. That person doesn’t seem to exist.

    Is Saijo Yaso the real writer of this poem? I’ve read this out loud in front of my friends a few years ago. Strangely, I got slightly luckier…

  7. Can you show me the wikipedia page of Saijo Yaso? Can you translate it for me? Just his biography.

  8. Its hard not to say whether there is a psychological effect, the poem is eerie as hell, while reading aloud the only thing to happen to me was shortness of breathe, chest pain shortly after, but im a smoker and laying down reading this probably did the trick in causing these symptoms while reading. Here’s a creepy fun fact, while reading silently in my head for the first time, i swear i heard a boy whispering it into my ear as i read it. spooky no? Then again i do get the best of paranormal events happening to me all the time and brush it off with a laugh, like a whistle mimicking spirit after taking a poop.. yeah the joy.. XD that happened tonight btw.. i found it rather creepy and funny. i blurted out come back anyday i’ll be here all year if you want another song to whistle to.. oh man id get a kick out of whistling with a spirit.

  9. I’m very glad I came across this translation!
    I’ve seen this cursed poem floating around the internet for the past two weeks and out of curiosity I looked it up. I have read both the Japanese and English translated versions out loud, and nothing has happened. Although I do find the poem itself haunting and beautiful I have yet to experience the supposed curse that surrounds it. Makes for a fun late night dare however.
    Thanks again for taking the time to translate it, I love poetry like this.

    • You bet! I’m a big lover of urban legends and spooky stuff (and a translator of Japanese poetry), so this hit a sweet spot for me. Personally, I don’t mind that the curse is (like most creepy pasta) largely invented: it exposed me to the work of this great poet and this haunting poem in particular, so I’m glad the legend exists. Thanks, Christina.

      • Dude, like seriously. I read this out loud and it did nothing.

        Well… My dog did poop on my bed. Is that part of the curse?

        • Clearly! Dude, poop on the bed? You’re cursed. Heh.

        • Ashely fernandez

          I was scared when I started reading. But at the end I felt like I was in a horror movie so I looked down in the comments I saw yours, and it made me laugh when your dog pooped on the bed

  10. I’ve read this out loud out of a dare in my school, both japanese and english versions last year. Nothing really happened to me and everything went on normal without any sign of bad luck. I only rediscovered this poem when I stumbled across this website. The poem is so creepy and very well-written and that I don’t even think it needs an urban legend to come with it to become popular.

    Thank you, David. I really appreciate this translation.

    • Thanks, Isaac! I agree that the poem is quite creepy enough without the urban legend, but luckily (IMO) that creepy pasta has drawn many young people into reading and discovering Japanese poetry. So win-win, huh? 😀

  11. I still didn’t understand why tomino is being punished… Please let me know what according to you happened with tomino and what’s with vomiting blood and breathing fire…. Though your translation is fantastic but I am still curious to clear my doubts…

    • Darshan, if we take the poem literally, it seems that Tomino has committed an unforgivable sin, like murdering his parents.

      However, a symbolic interpretation would be that a loved one has died, and his feelings of guilt about his poor relationship with his family have thrust him into a mental hell of regret.

    • Well, maybe Gene Simmons is involved. Fire? Blood? Lol…
      I am about to try my luck, gods help me. Cx

  12. I do not believe that this poem is cursed, however it was the creepy pasta story that lead me to it, because I was curious… I discovered the Japanese version, and I am a fan of anime so it made me happy. Could you explain in more detail what the part about the sisters means? I don’t really understand it

    • Jess, you can kind of take the stuff about the sisters at two levels. If Tomino is LITERALLY in hell, then his sisters are there with him (because he killed them, possibly), and they aid in his eternal punishment.

      However, if you look at the poem symbolically, his sisters have suffered in ways that have not touched him, and whatever tragedy has befallen the family and plunged him into a psychological hell brings with it the memory of his bad relationship with the girls, thereby causing him emotional distress.

  13. Breathing fire? That’s awesome. It’s like a super power.

    I read this out loud, nothing happened… Well, I did cut my finger with a knife while cutting unions just a few hours later.

    What a coincidence, am I right? These kind of things put some sort of suggestion onto your mind, making you believe that a slight unlucky moment is connected to the supposed curse.

    For example, when you stepped on a LEGO brick just a few seconds later after reading the poem, your mind quickly thinks that happened because of the curse. Though, you would’ve still stepped on the very exact same LEGO brick on the very exact spot on the very exact moment even if you never read or even discovered this poem.

    So… Who’s fault was it?

    A. Your child who never puts back his toys to its proper place?
    B. It was your fault because you’re already a grown-up and you still play with LEGOs?
    C. The curse.

    I would pick either A or B.

    Seriously though, this poem is very creepy, but absolutely safe to shout right in front of your friend’s face during a party before you get a hangover.

    I learned this one from Vsauce:
    It’s actually something called “Terror of Ambiguity”

    When it involves danger but no recognizable threat, it can make us think and feel some pretty weird things. Will reading this poem cause you to die after? Impossible, right?

    A recent study by J. Hames at Florida State University dubbed this “The High Place Phenomenon.” When approaching a ledge and a dangerous drop, your survival instinct kicks in and you pull yourself away. But your balance and motor system don’t get it. Nothing is pushing you and you don’t normally fall or leap randomly. So what’s going on? The part of your brain that processes intention might resolve this by determining that something must be pushing you or that you might actually want to jump or push your friend, even if none of that is true.

    tl;dr version: People are scared of this poem because it’s said it can kill them even if it won’t.

    The poem itslef overall? Love it.

    100/10

    Best poem ever

    3spooky5me

    9001/100

    9 stars out of 5

    Absolutely love it.

    kthnxbai

    • Thanks, John! I agree wholeheartedly with your assessment of the psychological impact that urban legends/creepy pastas have on people given our defense mechanisms.

  14. I tried 2 months ago 2 times japanese and so many times english because i failed many times but nothing interesting happenen.

  15. I’m not sure if it’s relevant but I think I have an explanation why the curse doesn’t work on all people. Before that I’ll add that I do not wish to be taken as superstitious witchdoctor! Anyway, as I was saying I’m familiar with a kind of black magic(that was used against my grandmother by a certain person I’m not gonna mention) that is written in a paper disguised as a phrase,essay,poetry or even meaningless random words. The words must be read in a certain way in order to take action.In her case it was written in Arabic and it was placed between the Qur’an she read every night before going to bed. The page was shown to me only once, it was a perfect imitation of the original page. As she was reading the page she suddenly noticed that she accidentally made some reading mistakes. This shocked her as the Qur’an was nearly memorised by her. Then she noticed some lines she had never seen before. Those lines didn’t match the words in her head which made her confused. Thus, she misread them. She noticed that something very strange was going on and stopped reading immediately. Later on she showed those words to an expert(Hafiz).According to him it was a death curse.If someone reads it out loud and gets the pronunciation and the rhythm correct he or she will either die or get mortally injured.It’s possible that my grandmother escaped death by misreading the curse.The curse was well planned as the Qur’an is usually read loudly and the readers strictly maintain correct pronunciation.Other than that that I’m clueless about the curse myself. Over that it was written in Arabic and it must be read in Arabic in order to active the curse and I cannot read Arabic. You know where I’m going with this,right? Listen David,if the curse of Tomino no Jigoku is anywhere near real it means there is specific way of activating it.You have to read the Japanese version (Possibly the version written with the exact letters used by the writer).I assume you know that as you’re quite an expert in the language. Reading romaji or the English translation should never work.Over that the pronunciation and the rhythm probably needs to be accurate as well(It’s a poem after all). Being such an old and disturbing(not to mention rumored to be carrying a death curse) piece of poetry it’s possible that it’s original rythm is long lost.’Cause whether a person believes or not he’ll surely be hesitant to read it aloud knowing it might kill him.It’s obvious that nearly everyone read it quietly all these years and now the rhythm is lost.There might not be more than a few person who are unfortunate enough to get it right.

    In case you have any doubt I’ll reassure that I narrated the story exactly how I remembered. But I know what I’m asking. No one has to believe me unwillingly.Not that I believe it all that much myself.

    PS
    Sorry for the huge reply!

  16. Well im too scarred and superstitious about reading this aloud… but i kind of already feel down in the dumps and weird after reading it in my head and silently…. just saying. 🙂 but great translation.!!!

    • Thanks! Yeah, it is pretty much guaranteed to depress the heck out of you, even without any supernatural death curse! Heh.

  17. I read both versions and all that happened to me was that I almosted fell down the stairs

  18. Just ran across this; I’m more familiar with youkai types of urban legends over the creepypasta so this new and neat to me! Quick question though. Didn’t kawaii originally have the meaning of “pitiful”? Is that why you translated it “sweet little” instead of “cute”? It makes a certain amount of sense, and gives it an even more bittersweet feeling.

    • Ruko, I know that “kawaisou” means “pitiful” in a more strongly negative sense, and “kawaii” has a slight nuance of “adorably pitiable.” I’m sure that’s what influenced me to pick “sweet little,” implying a degree of pity.

  19. What does しゅぶさ mean?
    Here it’s “the purpose of the scourging hangs dark in his mind”, while in other translations it is”I wounder who the whip’s shubusa is?”

    • It’s a parenthetical note meaning “it’s the main part” (same as “主部”); it’s there to explain “朱総” or “shuso” (main concern). The line is basically telling us (as you can read in the note) that he’s worried or confused about why he’s being whipped.

  20. Read it out loud 3 times for good measure. Nothing really happened. I think it just relies on the ‘Placebo Effect.’

    It’ll curse you if you believe it will curse you, it won’t curse you if you don’t believe it will curse you.

    This comment is cursed. A cat will cuddle your face in your sleep.

  21. If this poem is cursed then I might be without having it read out loud, because I keep thinking about the meaning (also due to the lovely and enchanting translation). The interpretations given so far do not fit what I feel about the poem… Is there information about the author in english that might help understand his familiar situation or do you know anything more?

  22. Read it out loud in both languages and now I feel sick

  23. I’ve read it multiple times after reading it and listening to it. I’ve read the rougher translation from Google Translate you see on the creepypasta wiki, English, and this one just now. It’s caused me nausea, nervousness, a sense of dread especially when I read and listened it to it in Japanese. Though I am isolated, paranoid, and have hallucinations and other mental illnesses so don’t take my account super seriously. I get those feelings in general. I think it’s more the psychological effect. I used to find it lame but after some thought and understanding it’s scarier than you would think(especially if you were looking for nothing more than a creepypasta) This translation felt more natural and had a flow to it so that took some fear away for. Bless you for actually trying and doing the poem justice! 🙂 I might have to check a lot more of this site out! It looks great! 😀

  24. Update. Its been just over one year since i read this and posted. My 4th child was born 5 months premature, I am now divorced, had 2 work affecting injuries. Broken right hand and a spinal fracture.

  25. Don’t read the poem you feel the pain sorrow creepy you will see I promise because I see please ?

  26. I read the poem out loud by myself in japanes a first time and a second time I listen at loud again in japanese but nothing happen. I think if I would be so dangerous and deadliest it will be allowed or on the internet? What do you think? I use to search legend and curse about ghost and place who suppose to be hauted.

    • Yeah, I don’t think it’s actually deadly. I certainly wouldn’t post a translation if I believed it would do anyone real harm.

      I mean, it might mess you up psychologically, but…I guess I’m going to take that risk.

      • I think the same thing when I decide to read out loud, it just take more “power” when you always think about it. Like when you think ” oh my, it’s snowing a lot, I will make car accident for sure. Men will power are powerful. 3 years ago I went to japan in Aokigahara “suicide forest” during one day and maybe it was just the place who was a little freaking and the fact I heard about what people end up to there, but I felt something strange there for the first time in my life in my search of haunted place and curse legend. I take the out path for some minutes, because if you go to far you will be lost. When I went further on the path a weird feeling began to grown. It was in summer and it’ was really hot, but when i was walking i feel like it was suddenly in early winter in my contry, a deep sadness and distress mix with anger has pass trough me… it was strange…extremely short but powerful to make me doubt, like if the people who have died there were trying to escape this place where they are prisoner… But maybe it was just my imagination
        Another exemple of urban legend I heard wasIt’s the legend about a curse temple in japan where you must’n sing a certains song when you pass forward the temple, or the people who has die there will come back and plunge you in a other dimension or ghost dimension where you will be like them forever. Sadly I never found this village and the people around was a little scary about it, japanese people are really supersitious about that kind of thing. Do you have other legend, curse or storie like this one?

  27. Just one question.

    The original urban legend story said that it was written by someone named Yomota Inuhiko. Is that true?

  28. Oh! This poem is quite beautiful and entertaining! I got chills just from reading it. Thank you for the translation. I’ve been waiting for a proper English version of this poem for years, but unfortunately, I’ve forgotten about the Urban Legend… Until now! I can’t say it’s cursed, though… I’ve quite a loud reader myself. I don’t even know how some people deal with reading only inside their heads… Yes, I’ve read pretty much every single version of Tomino’s Hell, and not the slightest sign of bad luck other than losing my wallet weeks ago, which is 3 years after reading the crappy translated version.

  29. the hoax ruined this poem for me

  30. Boy, have I got a story, and it’s not quite you’d expect from a poem like this.

    I was in a sleepover with my friends. We like to do spooky stuff like the Ouija Board and Charlie Charlie. I came up with the idea to read this version of the poem out loud, as well as the two other original versions.

    I’ve read it out loud and waited for something strange to happen. My mother had severe pneumonia to begin with, too. She might actually die from the curse.

    Well, what happened was that she got better from her pneumonia miraculously, and my father just won the lottery just weeks before she recovered. I don’t know what happened, but I think the curse just stopped working or something.

    I figured I get luck from this poem, so I read it again. This time, nothing happened. Got real boring.

    But as a piece, it’s quite amazing. It’s very spooky.

    • Hey, as the translator, I’ll take all the credit for the good things that come from reading the poem! 😉

      Glad your mother recovered!

  31. it aint fun anymore cuz ppl in the comments kept sayin the curse aint real

  32. I dunno, John. I still think it’s a fascinating poem, regardless of whether there’s a curse. But to each his own, right? 😀

  33. Can you tell me all about Saijo Yaso? Why did he really create this scary poem? I’ve heard he also wrote children’s poems that are also as creepy as this.

  34. I’ve done my own debunking of this poem.

    The original story of the curse apparently came from a Korean website, not Japanese. I would assume that the rumor was made up by Koreans. Japanese people are really good when it comes with Urban Legends (e.g. cursed kleenex commercial)

    The picture that comes with the poem is not even related to Tomino’s Hell at all. It’s from an artist named Tatsushima.

    The story also mentions Yomota Inuhiko, a film critic who actually WAS a writer of a few poems, but it’s unlikely Tomino’s Hell was one of the poems he wrote.

    What I can say is that Koreans made up the rumor and it spread to the point someone translated it with Google Translator.

    • So, if Koreans made up the story, then why wasn’t it the Japanese? It’s because the Japanese never considered this poem cursed. It was the Koreans from 2ch that got a hold of a copy and made up a story with a picture to go along with it.

      It’s just like when Japanese people mistook “It’s a Fine Day” with a German curse.

      • I have no doubt that some version of what you suggest happened. The poet was no practitioner of black magic who left behind a cursed poem. He simply wrote something obscure and vaguely hellish, and recently someone (whether Koreans or some other group/individual) concocted the curse. That’s the thing about creepy pasta…it’s actually made up, heh.

  35. This is weird, and I’m not joking. When I took a shower after reading this poem, lots of drops of shampoo went directly my eyes because my father knocked on the door, startling me. I stumbled around the shower in pain, slipped, and bruised my elbow. My eyes still feels swollen like hell while writing this.

    I don’t who to blame. The poem or my father.

  36. What bothers me even more is the image that is often associated with the creepypasta. It has nothing to do with the poem, hell, they don’t even have similar meanings. The painting is called “Now I’ll Never be a Bride.” , I believe. Not so sure what that has to do with a little boy who’s mentally suffering.

  37. Do you know when the poem is written?

  38. I read this and i didn’t death

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